National Jazz Museum in Harlem January 2012 events

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem‘s January 2012 program schedule is well under way, but there’s still time to check out a variety of events this month. See the event schedule list below.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem – January

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Jazz Is: Now! with Jonathan Batiste

The State of 2012 Jazz

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Pianist and band leader Jonathan Batiste continues his successful Jazz Is: Now! series in which he and an ensemble explore jazz today, never forgetting the past but always swinging into the future. This month Batiste, now a co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem along with Christian McBride and executive director Loren Schoenberg, focuses on the State of Jazz in 2012.

Join us and discover the challenges and pleasures of jazz in this modern era in which technology, speed and celebrity often trumps all. But in the hands and minds of artists such as Jonathan Batiste, jazz is sure to not only survive, but thrive!

Friday, January 20, 2012

Harlem in the Himalayas

Summit Trio: Jonathan Batiste, Gene Bertoncini, Scott Robinson

7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

This is an evening not to miss. These three players are eclectic in the best sense of the term, sparks are sure to fly in this electric evening of spontaneous invention. The young pianist Jonathan Batiste (also a co-director of the museum), the elder guitarist Gene Bertoncini, and the veteran multi-instrumentalist and conceptionist Scott Robinson have all graced the stage at the Rubin Museum of Art separately. But tonight, in an inter-generational mix with endless musical possibilities, the three join forces to create musical magic together!

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Jazz for Curious Listeners

Louis Armstrong Month: Hello, Dolly—1958-1964

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Part four of Ricky Riccardi’s month-long look at Louis Armstrong’s later years will begin with Louis riding high in the late 1950s before suffering a heart attack in Spoleto, Itlay in 1959.  It didn’t slow him down as the 1960s found Louis making some of his most challenging recordings with Duke Ellington and Dave Brubeck. Finally, in late 1963, Louis recorded a showtune, “Hello, Dolly,” that would knock the Beatles off the top of the charts at the height of Beatlemania.  More rare videos will be shown, such as Louis co-hosting the “Mike Douglas Show” in 1964.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Jazz Is: Now! with Jonathan Batiste

The State of 2012 Jazz

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Pianist and band leader Jonathan Batiste continues his successful Jazz Is: Now! series in which he and an ensemble explore jazz today, never forgetting the past but always swinging into the future. This month Batiste, now a co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem along with Christian McBride and executive director Loren Schoenberg, focuses on the State of Jazz in 2012.

Join us and discover the challenges and pleasures of jazz in this modern era in which technology, speed and celebrity often trumps all. But in the hands and minds of artists such as Jonathan Batiste, jazz is sure to not only survive, but thrive!

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Jazz for Curious Listeners

Louis Armstrong Month: What a Wonderful World – 1965-1971

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 4D)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

In final part of Ricky Riccardi’s look at the later years of Louis Armstrong, Riccardi will chart Armstrong’s twilight years, beginning with a triumphant tour of the Iron Curtain in 1965. Trouble with his teeth and the tiresome life of one-nighters gradually began affecting Armstrong as the 1960s wore on, but he continued making memorable music, such as “What a Wonderful World.” Riccardi will share many videos of Armstrong’s final years, which ended with Louis pushing himself to stay before the public until the very end of his life.